Reviews of Kepler

Stephen Curry

http://www.lablit.com – 13 July 2008

 

Astronomy is a science with truly universal appeal because, simply put, it sets the stage for the mystery of human existence. Who has not gazed up at the starry night sky and paused to wonder at our place in the cosmos? In John Banville’s Kepler, this moment of dizzying wonderment is refracted through the life of the eponymous German astronomer and mathematician to create an exquisite novel…

 

http://www.lablit.com/article/396

 

Russell McCormmach

The New York Times- 29 May 1983

 

FEW scientists have become the subjects of novels, but the great cosmologists of the 16th and 17th centuries who refashioned the ancient world picture – Copernicus, Kepler and Galileo – have repeatedly captured the imagination of novelists. The German astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630), who so far has received his best fictional treatment in ”The Redemption of Tycho Brahe” by Max Brod, appears again in John Banville’s ”Kepler,” a fictional life with high aspirations…

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1983/05/29/books/he-remodeled-the-cosmos.html

 

Michael Irwin

London Review of Books – 19 February 1981

 

A reviewer must allow for his personal reading temperament, his instinctive critical preferences and dislikes. John Banville roused my own antipathies as early as the second page of his novel: Kepler, arriving at a Bohemian castle, is greeted by a hump-backed dwarf who pipes, ‘God save you, gentles,’ and to make matters worse has second sight…

 

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v03/n03/michael-irwin/reconstructions